Tejas Trails 2017-12-28T22:14:38+00:00

Tejas Trails Race Plans

Focused Training Plans for Tejas Trail Races

Tinajas 50k

Beginner:

This plan is an easy to follow 16-week training schedule ideal for beginner and novice runners.  The training load begins with 22 miles/week and tops out at 44 miles by week 13.  Prior to beginning the training plan, the athlete should be running consistently (3-4 days/week) and be able to run 10 miles at an easy effort.  This plan is focused with a proper balance of aerobic/easy running, intensity/speed work, hill strength work, rest/recovery days, and duration with longer workouts focused for the weekends.  Beginning on week five there is an extra day of running and an optional power-hike workout.  Complete your 50km race with confidence.

Intermediate/Advanced:

This plan is an easy to follow 16-week training schedule for intermediate to advanced runners.  The training load begins with 35 miles/week and tops out at 56 miles by week 13.  Prior to beginning the training plan, the athlete should be running consistently (5 days/week) and be able to run 12 miles at an easy effort.  This plan is focused with a proper balance of aerobic/easy running, intensity/speed work, hill strength work, rest/recovery days, and duration with longer workouts focused for the weekends.  There is a rest week every fourth week to allow the body to recover and adapt to the training load.

*50k plans have 2 experience levels; Beginner 50k, Intermediate/Advanced 50k.

Tinajas 100k

This is an abbreviated 13-week training plan for Tinajas 100km race on March 3rd, 2018.  The athlete using this plan should be running upwards of 40-50 total miles per week with their long run around 20 miles. The plan begins with two rest days per week and five days of running for the first five weeks. There is a build-up to a 50km long run seven weeks out from the race. The athlete may choose to run a 50km race so long as it’s done at 100km effort or easier. For optimal gains in performance this plan uses a periodization approach that has three weeks of volume-building and one week for recovery. There is a good balance of speed work, hills, long runs, back-to-back long runs, and easy recovery runs to ensure the athlete gets a variety of training to be fit and ready come race day.

Hells Hills 50k

Beginner:

This plan is an easy to follow 16-week training schedule ideal for beginner and novice runners.  The training load begins with 22 miles/week and tops out at 44 miles by week 13.  Prior to beginning the training plan, the athlete should be running consistently (3-4 days/week) and be able to run 10 miles at an easy effort.  This plan is focused with a proper balance of aerobic/easy running, intensity/speed work, hill strength work, rest/recovery days, and duration with longer workouts focused for the weekends.  Beginning on week five there is an extra day of running and an optional power-hike workout.  Complete your 50km race with confidence.

Intermediate/Advanced:

This plan is an easy to follow 16-week training schedule for intermediate to advanced runners.  The training load begins with 35 miles/week and tops out at 56 miles by week 13.  Prior to beginning the training plan, the athlete should be running consistently (5 days/week) and be able to run 12 miles at an easy effort.  This plan is focused with a proper balance of aerobic/easy running, intensity/speed work, hill strength work, rest/recovery days, and duration with longer workouts focused for the weekends.  There is a rest week every fourth week to allow the body to recover and adapt to the training load.

*50k plans have 2 experience levels; Beginner 50k, Intermediate/Advanced 50k.

Hells Hills 50 mile

This is a 20 week 50 mile race plan. The athlete using this plan should be running upwards of 40 total miles per week with their long run around 15 miles. The plan has one rest day per week, five days of running per week, and one day of cross-training. There is a build-up to a 50km long run 6 weeks out from the race. The athlete may choose to run a 50km race so long as it’s done at 50 mile effort or easier. For optimal gains in performance this plan uses a periodization approach that has three weeks of volume-building and one week for recovery. There is a good balance of speed work, hills (+power-hiking), long runs, back-to-back long runs, and easy recovery runs to ensure the athlete gets a variety of training to be fit and ready come race day.